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Do-it@Home: Know thy running gait

09/12/2009

What is gait? (In my own words, just like being asked by a teacher to define a word …), gait is the way how your legs/feet move when walking or running.

So yes we also need to know what is our gait to get the proper running shoes.  Again, gait can be measure in most running, or sport shops that sell running shoes.  But then, you are in the woop far away land of the bush and you couldn’t be bothered to go to the city just to have your gait checked by the machine and video but do not intend to buy a new running shoes yet.  To save you from travelling, and or gas, or effort to go ask the running shop and give you an idea what your running gait is, follow this steps:

Get a worn out running shoe(s), the most worn out it is, the better. Simple.  There are two steps in checking.
Put the shoe on top of a table, heel facing you at eye level and picking it up and looking at the sole.

Overpronation – When shoes tend to lean inwards.  Pick the shoe up and look at the sole, if the sole is worn out on both inside the heel and at the side of your pinky toe.  Best shoe recommended is Stability shoes.

Neutral – Shoe is worn out evenly all throughout the sole.  Pick the shoe and examine that the sole is worn out on all of the sole surface.  Best shoe recommended is Neutral cushioning shoes.  This is me.

Underpronation/Supination – When the shoe tend to lean sideways outward.  Pick the shoe and side of the hill outside is worn out.  Neutral Cushioning shoes.

Best explanation so far from the net I have read is this that explains how does the gait mecahnism of your foot affect your running or walking read here.

So the running shop is right, I need to wear a neutral running shoes. However, I still need to go to a podiatrist and check do I need an orthotics? I hope not!

Did you know that? The ideal landing position is slightly toward the outside edge of your foot, just behind your little toe. Your foot would then naturally roll slightly inward while pushing off over your big toe. The slight inward roll of your foot is called pronation and provides some cushioning during the running stride. A small amount of pronation is normal and desirable, but excessive pronation can also be the cause of injury and stride inefficiencies. While motion control shoes will temporarily solve the problem, it is like putting a band aid on a cut that will never heal. It solves the immediate problem but it not a long term cure.

If you pronate  severely it is suggested that you should consult with a physical therapist to find out of there are alternatives  to motion control shoes in your specific case.

Also watch this borrowed videos

Overpronation

Normal pronation


Underpronation

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3 Comments leave one →
  1. 09/12/2009 9:14 am

    this info is very helpfull i always wondered what my gait was in a profesional point of view but i was always lazy to see really have it analyze. thank you very much regards

    Hope you are injury free already Pat! and Good luck on your organized Marathon :)!

  2. 11/12/2009 3:18 am

    I recently discovered that I’m overpronated =(

    i often feel pain in my ankles.

    I think you should not get disappointed with that hotlegs. You can get a stability shoes to assist your being overpronated :) Kepp on running!

  3. 12/01/2010 7:53 am

    i am a professional athlete.. but while running i feel little bit pain in my left ankle.. doctors has advised me to change the running technique and shoe.. can you tell me what type of shoe should i use ??

    CPR Classes

    Hi, You should check your gait and arch as written. If uncertain, find a running store that does measure your foot gait and arch.

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